He Kept the Scars

In Lethal Weapon 3, Lorna Cole (Rene Russo) and Riggs (Mel Gibson) find themselves comparing scars.

Riggs starts it off.  “Look at this one, the texture is great!  Dragged for half a block. It was a moving truck”

Lorna replies. “Yeah, well this one, I was shot clean through”

Riggs questions. “What was it? A 22?”

With an offended arch to her eyebrow and defensive tone Lorna replies “No Riggs, a 38!”

They go on and on, comparing scar after scar and the stories that went with them.

My husband and I still laugh at this scene. Occasionally, we find ourselves comparing our bad days.  When we catch on to each other we go full-on into our Lorna and Riggs roles, trying to one-up each other with our “scars” from the day of battle. It always makes us laugh at our no good, horrible, terrible days.

As much fun as we have helping each other dump from the day and move to the light-hearted realization that tomorrow will be different, we both know the power of a scar.

Scars tell a story and it is always about the past.

In this western Christian world, I get the impression that a really great spiritual Warrior isn’t supposed to have scars, doesn’t remember the past, rises above the emotion to only look forward but never back.

But I think Jesus shows us something entirely different.

The journey from Gethsamane to the Cross, the grave and resurrection is an explicit capturing of Jesus as Wounded~Healer~Warrior.

The Garden was the bedrock of battle for the role he was asked to live out.  In the garden Jesus relinquished his right to be a warrior in order to be wounded.  For to be a warrior in that moment would condemn us all to eternal separation, for there is not one among us that is without sin.  The way to win this eternal war required the wounding of the Son of God.  The Garden is where the decision to allow the wounding won.

Yet in the moment, when Peter stepped out to be a warrior and cut off the ear of the servant, Christ turned and healed.   He healed because Jesus understood that man was not the enemy he needed to war against.

In the finality of the cross, it seemed that Christ’s wounds had won.  The blood and water spilled seemed evident of death’s victory.

Christ’s wounded body was laid in the grave. He descended to Hell and there became the warrior.  He won the eternal victory against the enemy of our souls.

And when he rose again, he took on a glorified body. Yet in the perfection of this victory he surprises us with an unlikely fact.

Now Thomas (called Didymus), one of the Twelve, was not with the disciples when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord!” But he said to them, “Unless I see the nail marks in his hands and put my finger where the nails were, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe it.” A week later his disciples were in the house again, and Thomas was with them. Though the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here; see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it into my side. Stop doubting and believe.”   (John 20:24-27 NIV)

In the perfection of His Love ~ In the perfection of His successful Battle Plan ~ In the perfection of his Glorified Body

HE KEPT THE SCARS!

And he showed that the scars have a purpose.

They tell the story of wounds that DID heal.

They tell the story of battles of deathly blows from Satan.

The Scars show Victory

You see, dead bodies don’t heal. 

Dead bodies can’t scar. 

Only Warrior’s live to tell the story of how they were wounded and who healed them.  Warrior’s with scars know when to fight and when to stand because they know who they are  and who is the enemy.

Jesus Christ ~ The Ultimate Wounded~Healer~Warrior lives in me!  And here is the scar to prove it!

Want to compare scars?  I would love to hear the story!

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2 responses to “He Kept the Scars

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